New year, new you. Out with the old; in with the new. Make a brand new start. Or how about one of my favorites, “You are never too old to set another goal or to dream a new dream” (C.S. Lewis). When New Year’s rolls around, we often find ourselves contemplating change. What type of change are you considering this year? Buying/selling a home. Relocating. Losing weight. Exercising more often. Traveling. Finding the man of our dreams (and marrying him). Getting pregnant. Adopting a puppy. What about a career change or new job?

model-2614569_1280It’s natural to set goals, make resolutions, and fine-tune our life’s focus in January. Part of that fine tuning for many of us involves initiating a job search. For some, it involves changing careers and embarking an exciting career adventure.

How do you know if you’re really ready to search for a job or change career paths?

Assessing your level of career contentment

When I work with clients who are contemplating a career change, we start by assessing their current level of contentment at work. Are you happy to arrive at work most mornings? Do you hit snooze and feel anxious or depressed about the workplace? How long have you felt dissatisfied with your job? When you attend work events, do you network with others or stay for 10 minutes before escaping? Do you live for the weekend? Are you excited about your current projects and tasks? Do you share your excitement with your friends/family? Or do you complain about the problems at work instead?

Checking our level of contentment is important. We have to evaluate a) how we truly feel about our jobs/careers, and b) why we might feel that way. Sometimes clients find that the problem lies within themselves. Maybe they’re struggling with stress at home, and it’s bleeding over into the workplace. Some of my clients chose a career path for all the wrong reasons to begin with and feel stuck. I’ve even referred clients to counselors if we discover there’s nothing wrong at work, and they just need some overall wellness help.

When you discover your career contentment level is low

I once found myself working in a corporate job, earning more money than I’d ever earned before in my life. The workplace was pretty upbeat, and the dress code was very casual. The expectations were reasonable. My colleagues were friendly and fun. So what was the problem? I just didn’t enjoy my tasks. I chose the job based on earning potential, not fulfillment potential. And I wanted to live closer to my husband (who was my boyfriend at that time).

Once I’d identified that I was dissatisfied at work, I examined whether I could change aspects of the job or my attitude. I worked diligently to find things to be grateful for at work, and that helped the days go by faster. But there wasn’t much I could do to alter other aspects of the job. I couldn’t force myself to love the nature of the job. And I couldn’t relocate the company or work remotely. My husband couldn’t relocate because he owned a business in a different region.

Taking action and making career decisions

What should I do next? Once I’d established that I either had to accept the job and continue doing it or search for a new one, I went through my normal decision-making process.

During my time of reflection, talking to my mentor, and praying about the decision, I saw the solution clearly. I decided to send a message to several friends living near my husband. I asked for their help in finding employment. And I waited and prayed.

Less than 24 hours later, one of my friends, someone I’d known for years, responded and offered me a job. He warned me that the position didn’t pay very well. But he also gave me the option to accept the job temporarily while searching for more gainful employment. I saw this as a clear sign to move forward and make the change. I accepted the position after a phone interview and gave a two-week notice at work. By Christmas, I was on my way to relocating and interviewing for other jobs while working in a temporary job.

The next step

I’m not trying to tell you that if you click your heels and make a wish—or say a prayer—your dream job will fall in your lap. But I am trying to share a career discovery and decision-making process that has worked pretty well for me. Take the right steps and remain action-oriented. But don’t forget to follow your gut at the end of the day. If a big paycheck isn’t satisfying you, that’s okay. Can you make lifestyle adjustments to lower your standard of living? If you used to love serving others as a teacher, but you feel exhausted in every way, it’s okay. What other careers interest you? Do you have transferable skills?

We can talk one-on-one about your current feelings about work. And we can develop a plan of action for the coming year. Reach out to me for help if you’re ready to get to work and find career fulfillment.

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